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Tactics Blitzez and Boxez

Discussion in 'General Blood Bowl News and Discussion' started by Cybermage100, Nov 28, 2010.

  1. Cybermage100

    Cybermage100 Member

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    Ok so not boxes, but cages... it just didn't sound as catchy.

    I have a couple of question which I know are very large questions but they are two thing I feel I am lacking understanding in having a good offense.

    My first question: I am having a lot of trouble understanding the use of the Blitzers. Any player can blitz, they are just supposed to be better at it... But how exactly does it work? You charge forward, blitz one character aside, then move in a few others to mark other opposing players so they cant surround him? That just doesn't seem right to me but its all I can figure...

    The second question (and i probably should have posted 2 threads) is that I understand the concept of the cage. You block in your ballcarrier so he is protected, and you dont want to leave your cage corners touching an enemy, otherwise they could just block your corner and open the cage. Given that, though, how do you ever advance your cage? Typoically, it seems any steps you take (besides lateral) would leave you open for a block on the next turn.

    Sorry again if these questions are rather large. I really hope to start getting a better grasp on the game so I can continue to improve and enjoy it.
     
  2. Murkglow

    Murkglow Member

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    Blitzer is just a name. They are not really any better at Blitzing then anyone else. Well the Blitzer player type tends to start with Block (which most other player types do not) and they often have more movement so in that respect they are better but besides the skill/stat advantages....

    As for "how" you blitz... That depends on the situation. You want to hit a target that matters usually. Hopefully it's the ball carrier or someone protecting the ball carrier or someone blocking your carrier from advancing. As for what to do after that, well again it depends. Marking players can be good, blocking players from advancing can be good too. You really need a specific situation for a more detailed discussion on this topic.

    You, of course, move your cage with you. Hopefully you're able to have relatively similar speeds on your corners and carrier so they can move together easily but it's not required. Of course the defender's idea is to block that advance and it's up to the offense to exploit any weakness/mistakes in the defense to open a gap and get your cage through.
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2010
  3. Gallows Bait

    Gallows Bait Super Moderator Moderator

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    Well, a couple of answers from my point of view, though they're only one opinion.

    Blitzes offer you the chance to make blocks for a variety of reasons - opening a hole in the line for a catcher to run through, knocking down an opposing catcher in your half, pushing an opposing player off the sideline into the crowd or breaking into a cage - don't ever think the cage is their only purpose. Having the ability to move and block once per turn is very powerful.

    Ultimately though, for breaking a cage, the purpose more often than not, is not just to get into a position to win a turn of blocks, but to slow down the opponant and make them take more risks and force them to use up more movement for less ground gained.

    A blitzer that can knock down the corner of a cage is one that can get into base contact with the ball carrier. This means that the opponant will either have to block or blitz that player, or have the ball carrier dodge if they want to move - this forces them to make dice rolls, all of which have a chance of failing. If the blitzer that has broken into the cage has supporting players around him, then the opponant will have less assists to improve his blocks, making it riskier still for them to block to free up the ball carrier.

    If you're really luck you can blitz the ball carrier, though with a cage its hard to dodge into contact due to the number of tacklezones around them, which is why usually people will break one corner and hope to remain standing in the next turn to do more blocking.

    Regarding advancing the cage, there's one thing here that really comes to mind. The first is that unless the opponant is in direct contact with your cage, you're at least going to be able to move one square into contact - and force the opponant to either block you or dodge back. For high strength and high armour teams this is important - a weaker team will be reluctant to block, especially if some of your players have guard as well as block. This at least sets a minimum pace for stronger teams. Other than that, if you are able to be in contact and successfully block or blitz down the opposing defence, then the cage members behind can push through the gap and form a new front line to your cage, moving it down more than one square if its done correctly or if the defence is a thinly spread line.

    This is why a lot of defence tactics are deeper, they only allow the offence to move forward a little before coming into contact with a second line or row that can't be blitzed or blocked in the same turn.

    As you can imagine, a cage is more of a tactic for stronger teams in that respect, but it can be used by all - its just that weaker teams may have a harder time forcing their way down pitch. Quite often though these teams can have cages that exist primarily just to defend the ball carrier, and as such will move more dramatically around the pitch - dodging to new positions as they try to get around the side of a defence or otherwise force the ball closer, ready to open up for either a throw or a rush to the end zone.
     
  4. maxcarrion

    maxcarrion Active Member

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    OK, a blitz (literally not in BB) is a fast, aggressive move, and that's exactly what a blitzer specialises in, they will usually be one or often both of faster and better at blocking than the linemen. They are the people who chase down the thrower and knock him down, clear a path for your players or generally apply violence with speed. They are better at blitzing then a lineman cause they will have more speed, so can blitz further away, and will usually have block which makes both down results better for you.

    The simplest way to move a cage is to use the remaining members of your team to clear a path. 5 players make a cage, a centre and 4 corners, that leaves 6 players to open a gap for the cage to run through. You can use speed, numbers or strength to advance a cage running around and through opposing players and using new players to form a cage where original cage members can't make it and it takes at least 2 ranks of players to prevent a blitz opening a gap up to run one through. Mark up a few players and move around the existing wall and they have to scramble to reform in front of you
     
  5. Cybermage100

    Cybermage100 Member

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    Thanks for the input there, both of you.

    The explanations of the blitzing and how to more effectively use a cage by both agile and strong teams explains a lot to me... Still another thing entirely to put it into practice, though.

    I did a "test game" to try out some different strategy... turns out the game gave me a Skaven team vs my own Skaven team... lets just say once it hit 0-2 I decided I needed more practice. Sheesh.

    I guess I need to give in to popular opinion and try out the Orcs to cut my teeth on. I really didn't wanna play Orcs. :)

    Thanks again for the help.
     
  6. Murkglow

    Murkglow Member

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    You don't need to use Orcs as your first team if you don't want to. Norse are pretty new player friendly (especially if you don't pick up many frenzy players straight off). Dark Elves are also decently new player friendly (especially for an elf team) as they can have 4 blitzers (which mean quite a bit of early block) and good armor for an elf team. Really it depends more on what you want to play, quite a few teams are good for new players (Skaven just isn't one of them, though if you don't mind losing a few early on you can still learn with Skaven ;)).
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2010
  7. Cybermage100

    Cybermage100 Member

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    Well, I didn't get your post til after I had already started my Orc team, Murkglow. I did try DE as my very first team but i lost horribly... I am sure that was massively due to inexperience, plus I bought the Assassin cause he "sounded all cool" then watched him get pummeled every turn. I learned the hard way...

    Anyways, my Orc team, Da Beata Boyz, had their first match and I won 1-0! ... again... goblins... for some reason I feel like I should have done better against them. Ah well, one of my main blitzers leveled up during the match (he outright killed 2 gobbys) so hopefully next match will be even better.

    I'm not basing success solely on my score, btw, I just feel like I shouldn't have taken so long to score on Goblins.